FOXY PRINTS vol. 1

the Pacific Northwest

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  • Limited run of these prints. When they're gone, they're gone.

  • All prints are 20 x 30.

  • A portion of the proceeds of each print sold will be donated to charity. In the future, each collection will be paired with a different charity.

  • While each of these prints mean something to me, photographs are subjective. Rather than telling you why I chose them, I will tell you about the moment and give you the space to experience each of them personally.

The Peak   I hiked around the bend and as the trail opened up, I glanced over and saw Mt. Rainier. I remember thinking, "This looks like a painting." A beast of a volcano, Mt. Rainier is the highest point of the Cascades. Regardless of how many times I've seen it, a clear, unobstructed Mt. Rainier sighting will always take my breath away.     buy now

The Peak

I hiked around the bend and as the trail opened up, I glanced over and saw Mt. Rainier. I remember thinking, "This looks like a painting." A beast of a volcano, Mt. Rainier is the highest point of the Cascades. Regardless of how many times I've seen it, a clear, unobstructed Mt. Rainier sighting will always take my breath away. 

buy now

 
Wabi Sabi   Wabi Sabi is a Japanese term for  finding beauty in imperfections . Everything about this image is wrong: the dock is lopsided, the person is far left, and the composition is off-center. But, somehow, it works. This photograph captures how, individually, everything might be imperfect, but, all together, they can still make something beautiful.    buy now

Wabi Sabi

Wabi Sabi is a Japanese term for finding beauty in imperfections. Everything about this image is wrong: the dock is lopsided, the person is far left, and the composition is off-center. But, somehow, it works. This photograph captures how, individually, everything might be imperfect, but, all together, they can still make something beautiful.

buy now

 
Summer in the PNW   Seattle gets a lot of criticism for having crappy weather, but nothing beats a PNW summer. It's warm, but never too hot, the sun is out until past 9PM, and the sunsets are out of this world. In the PNW, July 4th marks the beginning of summer.     buy now

Summer in the PNW

Seattle gets a lot of criticism for having crappy weather, but nothing beats a PNW summer. It's warm, but never too hot, the sun is out until past 9PM, and the sunsets are out of this world. In the PNW, July 4th marks the beginning of summer. 

buy now

 
 

FOXY PRINTS vol.1 charity: PARSA

Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

PARSA (Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Support for Afghanistan) is a NGO that builds healthy Afghan Communities with a focus on helping disadvantaged women and children. They do this in 3 ways:

  • Building economies for women. PARSA empowers women through economic means. They market quality products made by Afghan women, while creating a national network of women-run businesses.
  • Building healthy families. They offer training for social workers and caregivers of orphans, disabled people, and battered women.
  • Building youth leadership. PARSA focuses on initiatives, like Afghan Scouts, that hone leadership skills. The Scouts partner with local police to engage in community outreach and community service projects.

Why PARSA?
I am lucky enough to call the PNW home. I am fortunate enough to know that I am safe and have access to a wide range of opportunities. I have chosen to donate to PARSA to help women and children living in a war-torn country with no sense of guaranteed safety and highly restricted access to opportunities to better their situations. While I am fortunate enough to be where I am, these women and children did not have a choice. A portion of every purchase made will go towards improving their homes and lives.

 

FOXY PRINTS FAQ

Why such a small collection?

The paradox of choice.

Too many options makes the decision process incredibly difficult and can even lead to buyer's remorse.

“Even if we manage to overcome the paralysis and make a choice, we end up less satisfied with the result of the choice than we would be if we had fewer options to choose from." - Barry Schwartz

 

Why only one size?

In addition to the paradox of choice applying here, composition is incredibly important because it can drastically change the feeling of a photo. For example, a more square crop will feel different than a wider crop. A lot of thought went into each of these photos and I believe they're at their best in a 20x30. 

 

How often will you be releasing volumes?

I won’t have scheduled volume releases for two reasons: 1) I will never sell a print just for the sake of selling a print and 2) I will never sacrifice quality over quantity. 

When I feel a volume has enough oomph, I’ll release it.

 

How do I know you will actually donate a part of the proceeds to charity?

I’ll send you a sexy selfie of me with a copy of the donation receipt and that day's newspaper.

AMBITION & SELF-SABOTAGE


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Bro… you should sell prints of your photos on Find Foxy
— Paulina

Paulina has told me many times that I should do it. It sounded like a no brainer: I have photos I want to share and setting up a simple online store is easy. But I never put anything into action. I would say to myself, "that's a good idea, I should do it", but 5 seconds later, I'd forget about it and go on with my day wondering why Paulina calls me bro.

I knew what the problem was, I just didn't want to face it: I was afraid to be vulnerable... so I sabotaged myself.

Self-sabotage is the act of throwing obstacles in your own path. It's a defense mechanism that's about self-preservation: survival of the ego.

If you ever doubted yourself, that's your ego self-sabotaging. For example, your ego might talk you into a half-assed attempt of something. This allows you to have a built-in excuse: in case you fail, you can blame it on your effort level vs. taking full responsibility. In other words, your ego is protected.

Self-sabotage happens ALL THE TIME. Below are just a few ways that I've screwed myself over.

  • Comparing myself to others. I would often think that other photographers were better than me. No way my photos are good enough. People wouldn't like them. Unfairly comparing myself to someone ensured that I shouldn’t even try.
  • Lack of confidence. Doubting myself and not believing in my photos erases any hope of success. Every single thing that can be looked at negatively, will be negative. Admitting defeat before I even start ensured that I wouldn’t try my best.
     
  • Fearing uncertainty. Opening myself up to criticism is scary. The brain has a negativity bias, so it’s natural to take criticism personally even though it's never personal. Believing criticism is about me ensured that avoiding vulnerability was a priority no matter the cost.

 

self-sabotage is self-loathing

 

Self-loathing may sound harsh but the act of sabotage is not one that stems from love; it’s cruel. The brain’s negativity bias makes sabotaging ourselves incredibly easy and efficient. As a result, self-sabotage leads to anxiety, lack of motivation, and depression.

It’s hard for me to say that I loathed myself at times, it sounded a little much. But the fact that I was taking actions to sabotage myself proved I did. You don't sabotage someone you love.

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I can’t control thoughts of self-sabotage, but I can control whether or not I put these damaging thoughts into action. So whenever I feel like I'm going to fuck myself over, I use that as a sign to go in the opposite direction.

I’ve done this before. When I began pursuing a career in film editing or asked Paulina out for the first time, I doubted myself right away. Thankfully, I looked the other way, took the risk, and everything worked out better than I could've imagined. 

With selling prints, I've gotten over the initial self-sabotaging hurdles. Now I'm taking the leap and feeling cautiously optimistic (exciting, I know). Whether or not I have any success, the one thing that I know is that I won't have any regrets.

Time to curate, print, and set up shop!

"print us out dude..."

"print us out dude..."

Exercise is Life


"I don't feel like going to the gym."

Up until a couple years ago, I never exercised. I was skinny as hell but had a belly full of fat. In order to stay thin, I would just cut down on how much I ate and not change what I ate. Pretty unhealthy and dumb. After the reality check that was cancer, I decided to take my health seriously. I knew the key to being healthy would be to:

  • Eat right
  • Exercise
  • Do both consistently over a long period of time

Being healthy is a long-term goal with no finish line. I'll never be "done" being healthy. I'm not that big into food so eating healthier wasn't too difficult. But as my track record had shown, exercise was going to be the challenging part.

The paradox of choice is a problem for me. If the option of not going to the gym is on the table, I'm screwed. To fix this, I built an exercise habit. I wanted to make exercise my only choice. Initially, I forced myself to go to the gym 3 times a week for a minimum of 5 minutes. After a couple weeks, I realized the hardest part was just getting my ass into the gym. When I was there, it was easy to work out for 30+ minutes. After working out consistently for a month, the habit was built. 

Removing the decision-making process makes exercising not a question of if, but of when. For a little over a year, I've been powerlifting 3 - 4 times a week and, during this adventure, I've gotten healthier and stronger. I've also learned something quite surprising:

 

The core concepts for succeeding in the gym are the same for succeeding in life.

 

DISCIPLINE - I know how easy it is to fall off the wagon and relapse into bad habits. Progress in life and health requires discipline to succeed.

  • Discipline only counts when you need it. It's easy to do something when I feel motivated. It's when I don't want to walk in the rain to the gym or edit a scene that hasn't been working for weeks that I need to be disciplined. Every time I avoid a task I know is good for me, I'm creating a bad habit.
  • Consistency is the key to success. The way the body changes and the way life unfolds happens over the long term. Results don't happen overnight. For me to achieve long-lasting change, I have to exercise, edit, or spend time with loved ones consistently over a long period of time. As James Clear says, "average speed yields above average results".

 

PAIN - Whether it's physical or emotional, my ability to be comfortable with pain will determine whether or not I will push through or give up.

  • The only way to make muscles grow is to damage them. Pushing my limits can be scary, but that's the only way I will get stronger. That will never change.
  • The only way to grow as a person is to challenge yourself and overcome adversity. I've put myself in difficult situations before. Sometimes they're so hard I give up and sometimes I surprise myself and make it through as a changed man.
  • Pain is part of the process. It makes or breaks a lot of people. Instead of trying to avoid it, I've learned to accept it.
 

FAILURE - It's the price you pay to be right. 

  • I've failed a lot powerlifting. I've gone through weeks of no progress and sometimes even slight regression. These "failures" were actually learning opportunities. Whether it led me to change my technique, what I ate, or how much I slept, I treated each failure like a scientist using trial and error to ultimately find the correct solution.
  • I've made a lot of mistakes in life. I used to regret them but not anymore. I look at them as lessons in trial and error: now I know what not to do. Life is too short to live with regret and beat myself up over something I cannot control. I choose not to make myself miserable.
  • It's never a failure if you can learn from it.
 

REMOVING EMOTIONS - Thinking emotionally sometimes complicates things. It usually starts with, "I don't feel like..." and ends with "...working", "...going to the gym", or "...eating broccoli".

  • Not feeling like doing something that you know is good for you is a form of self-sabotage: lack of compassion for oneself. I would sacrifice my long-term goals for instant gratification. Whether it's through procrastination, eating junk food, or hitting the snooze button, I was choosing to make myself unhealthy, stressed, or depressed.
  • In some cases, I have to remove my emotions from the equation and just do it.  "Just doing it" will lead me to accomplish my long-term goals. Of course it's easier said than done. My success rate is probably 65%, but improving.
 

Exercise is much more than just physical health. Its core concepts carry over to the rest of my life. As I see my body change, I look at it as a physical representation of my progress in life. When I do well in the gym, it gives me confidence to do well in life. It's one of the main reasons why I don't struggle going to the gym.

I enjoy doing well in life.